In today’s connected world, the traditional ideas of business and society have changed. 20 years ago, social media didn’t exist, and it was not a problem if your company didn’t send email. Now, because of the Internet, everything is a local business, even Amazon has become a local business, and a friend is someone you may never meet. Those socio-economic changes have brought about a new form of public awareness. Most importantly, your company must be easily searchable by anyone that cares to find your brand.

Fortunately, with the help of the internet, maintaining a public appearance is easier than ever. It is as simple as creating a Facebook page, and sending out emails that are unique to the audience you target. That is what drives engagement and keeps your name at the forefront of the customer’s minds (n.a., 2016; Rowley, 2016).

One of the biggest mistakes that small businesses make is they assume that just “existing” on social media is good enough. The most important aspect of any current marketing plan is that it provides intrinsic value. Intrinsic value doesn’t mean a special deal or promotion as many assume. What intrinsic value means is that there needs to be a reason for a customer to take a moment to look at what you have decided to show them. It can be a how to message, an exclusive deal, a funny anecdote, or an interesting picture. Whatever you choose to show, it must in some way highlight your brand (Rhoads; 2017; Daly, 2015; Rowley, 2015;).

For Destiny Electric, showing (what) they do has always been a great benefit, because rarely will you find companies in this industry that cares about fit and finish as much as the bottom dollar, and that is the primary goal of Destiny Electric.

As of mid-January 2017, Destiny Electric has been in business “officially” for 20 years (December 1996). The company has maintained many loyal customers, most of which have helped build the brand into what it is today. As mentioned in a previous post on this blog, the average customer for Destiny Electric is between 25 and 60 years of age. One of the biggest reasons for Destiny’s decision to move to social media is due to the economic downturn in the mid-2000’s, which took a toll on the contractors and developers that frequently did business with Destiny Electric. Now Destiny Electric is a growing company that is trying to reach a larger customer base. Today it is making changes, at times things go well, other times they fall flat, but the company is growing, and the benefits of the current changes have severely outweighed the negatives.

In creating a carousel ad, the process seemed daunting at first. However, it was quite simple once I found the “create ads” link on the Facebook menu bar. Hint!: it is on the drop down arrow beside the Facebook page administrator.

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The newest campaign for Destiny Electric is the 20th anniversary. “Serving Jacksonville for over 20 years”. Destiny Electric is very proud of the 20 years that the company has remained in business, especially during the most turbulent time for the construction industry since the Great Depression. Currently, there is not a logo on the trucks designating the 20 years of service. After weeks of consideration, that is a designation that will be staved off until the 25th anniversary. The lack of 20th logo is due to the company putting two new trucks on the road, launching a new logo in May of 2016, hiring new employees, and thousands spent on new wearable’s and equipment.

For a class this week I was asked to create a carousel ad for Destiny Electric. It was a fun experience that took a little Facebook know-how and creativity but was worth it in the end. I will share the experience with you now…

For another guide, please follow this link: https://www.facebook.com/business/help/1375829326076396?helpref=search

For inspiration, follow this link: https://www.facebook.com/business/help/927639917355563

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The first step to creating a carousel ad is to log in as administrator and select the drop down arrow. In the menu select the option to create a new ad. Then, choose what type of advertisement you want to run. I chose local awareness because Destiny Electric is not large enough to provide service outside of a 60-mile radius.

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If you have set up a Facebook page before, then from this point forward the process is quite simple. As the image above illustrates, you have to follow the menu bar (located on the left side of the page). Pick the range, age, and reach of the advertisement. As noted previously, Destiny Electric does not serve an area outside a 60-mile range, so I chose the closest range available, which was 45 miles.

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After you have filled out all of the tabs on the left side of the page, click continue at the bottom right. That brings you to the page (menu). This is the page where you will actually set up the appearance of the advertisements, in which you can select 3 to 4 (or more) images to be included in the carousel.

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The above image is the final design page, and it is by far the most important. It is at this step when you design what the advertisement will look like.

At Destiny Electric, the company is celebrating its 20th year in business. This “celebration” it is not as pronounced because the real celebration is being planned for the 25th anniversary, which takes place in 5 years. Nonetheless, the 20th is something the company, and it employees are proud to be part of. That is what is pushed in the new advertisements.

To highlight this, there are a few blocks of text included in the ad. The text boxes are “Text” and “Headline.”

In the Facebook Text box I included an agreed upon statement.

Destiny Electric has been servicing the Jax, Orange Park, Middleburg area since 1996. Commercial, Residential, Service Calls and New Construction. We have the expertise to cover it all!

It was part of the new-year plan, that Destiny Electric should start adding dates in the the social media posts.

The Headline text was a nod to Destiny Electric’s original slogan: “Let Destiny Work for You!” which decorated the business cards, shirts and vans until 2007.

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The final two pages that you will be brought to are the above “final look” image and the analysis/data page. These two pages allow you to get a final look at your ad, before you post it. The second image (below) shows the actual data page, this allows you to see the activity the post will receives throughout the duration of the post.

The following four photos are the ones used in the carousel:

Unfortunately, due to poor photo taking habits, we are not able to find any pictures older than six years, due to lack of photos, we decided that it is out best option to show what Destiny Electric “is,” not what Destiny Electric “was.”

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While this may seem to be a random selection of photos, it was strategic. The reason for choosing the four previous photos is that Destiny Electric want to show that not only is quality important, but the variation in the projects is important as well. A barber shop remodel, repairing/updating light poles in a parking lot, or a clean install in the homes of customers. (note) The DE staff took those photos before leaving the job, because the job isn’t done until everything is as clean as it was when we arrived. The photos show that we are up to date with new technology (I have yet to see new cree led lights on telephone poles in Jacksonville). Most of all, the photos are intriguing, and we believe they were the best click-bate we had a the moment.

 

The final product is shown in the following screen caps.

DESKTOP VERSION

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MOBILE VERSION

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Thank you for taking the time to read my blog,

-Joshua S. Schery

 

 

References:

Daly, J. (2015, December 07). Email Marketing Best Practices: 40 Tips for Dramatically Better Emails. Retrieved February 08, 2017, from http://www.getvero.com/resources/guides/email-marketing-best-practices/

n.a. (2016, December 19). Retrieved February 08, 2017, from http://www.attn.com/stories/12673/difference-between-working-now-and-thirty-years-ago

Rhoads, J. S. (2017, February 6) MMC5006 Week 6 Lecture. Email.

Rowley, T. (2016, January 12). The Importance of Social Media in Email. Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/importance-social-media-email-thomas-rowley

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